Eating For Allergies: Healthy Swaps For Everyday Staples

eating-allergies-healthy-swaps-everyday-staples
Eating For Allergies: Healthy Swaps For Everyday Staples

If you’ve lived with an eating for  allergy for a long time, perhaps your entire life, then you’re probably well aware of the alternatives. If, however, you’ve recently developed an eating for allergy, or maybe your child has, then knowing which foods to avoid, and importantly, which foods you can substitute, is incredibly important.

We’ve detailed a few of the most common allergies here, and offered advice on what you can sub in to replace them. Where appropriate, we’ve even mentioned where an alternative might be better for you, even if you don’t have allergies.

Swap: Almond butter for peanut butter
The first and most obvious on our list is the peanut. Millions of children and adults around the world suffer from an allergy to peanuts and other tree nuts — often just peanuts. Cases range from mild to severe, and exposure to peanuts can be fatal for those with an extreme allergy.

Swapping almonds in for peanuts is a good idea, and a great way of introducing healthy fats and protein back into your diet. Almonds are also rich in vitamin E, which is fantastic for maintaining healthy skin and hair. Almond butter can be spread and blended just like peanut butter, and the flavour is more delicate than peanut butter, too.
Tip: Almonds add an awesome crunch when sprinkled with coriander on top of curries and salads.

Swap: nut milk for dairy
If dairy is your foe, then swapping it out in favour of nut milk (or mylk, as it’s often called), could be the way forward.

Nut milks are made by blending and pressing different nuts, then mixing with spring water, and sometimes a natural sweetener or thickener. You’ll need to experiment with the kind of nut milk that suits your tastes, as they all have their own unique flavours. Making them yourself is easy, but can be costly. We recommend buying your nut milk from any large supermarket. You’ll find cashew, almond and hazelnut in most places.
Tip: Nut milks don’t do so well in coffee, but if we had to choose one, it’d be cashew milk, as it has the mildest flavour, and the best texture.

Various swaps for eggs
Eggs used to be a problem area for people with allergies, but with so many replacements, if you’re making your own food, then it shouldn’t be too much of a problem. This brilliant post over at She Knows, details four great substitutes for eggs, including bananas, applesauce, flaxseeds and a mixture of oil, flour and water.
Swap: buckwheat for wheat-wheat
Don’t let the name fool you — buckwheat is 100% wheat and gluten-free. It’s also high in protein and can be found in seed form, or ground into flour. Check out these cool recipes for buckwheat bread, and for dessert, try buckwheat pancakes.
Those are a few of our favourite swaps for your everyday staples. Got one that you love? Let us know on Facebook.

Read More: Why Choose All-Natural Food Over Processed

FitBites Love Hemp Protein

Let’s talk about Hemp Proteinhemp protein

We’re always looking for new and exciting ways to get as much delicious nutrition into our FitBites as possible. So, when we came across hemp protein which not only ticks all of our ‘organic’ and ‘gluten-free’ boxes, but also provides a substantial vegan-friendly protein source, we were pretty excited.

 

Let’s clear something up straight away, though; when we talk about hemp, we are talking about the same family of plants that marijuana comes from, but hemp seeds do not contain anywhere near enough psychoactives to produce an effect (less than 0.3% by weight.)

How is Hemp Protein Made? 

The hemp seed is harvested, before being separated from its husk and pressed to remove the oil. The oil goes on to be used for other purposes, while the resulting seed ‘cake’, is ground into a fine powder – this is the hemp protein that we mix into FitBites Protein HIIT balls.

Amino Acid Jackpot 

Unfortunately, a lot of other non-animal and non-dairy proteins are poor alternatives, having either a pretty low protein content, or other nasty side-effects (usually digestive.) Hemp protein is not only high in protein, it also contains all 21 amino acids, including the nine we can’t make inside our bodies – meaning we have to get them through our diets. Those nine essential amino acids are:

  • histidine
  • leucine
  • isoleucine
  • lysine
  • methionine
  • phenylalanine
  • threonine
  • tryptophan
  • valine

These amino acids aren’t just important for building muscle after hitting the gym, either, they’re crucial to allowing all of your body’s organs and systems to function properly, from your kidneys and liver, to your brain and nervous system.

Fatty acids 

The omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids that are found in hemp protein are naturally occurring, they’re not added in. They’re essential, too, for optimum brain function and for helping to reduce inflammation (omega-3.)

You’ll only find tiny amounts of these fantastic fatty acids in FitBites, because they’re pretty small, but if you’re interested in their health benefits, we would recommend doing a bit more reading about them. You could start here.

Vegan-friendly 

We’ve mentioned it already, but we were incredibly excited to start using hemp protein, because we know that for vegans, finding good sources of protein can sometimes be challenging. We would love it if, after trying our Protein HIIT balls, you bought yourself some hemp protein to use as a regular supplement.

Two tablespoons of hemp protein contains around 15g of protein.

If you have questions about hemp protein, or any of our other ingredients, we’d be happy to discuss them with you. Join us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Spirulina Stretch Uncovered

Did you know that spirulina is the richest source of plant protein in the world? Its protein content is around 60% of its weight, and gram-for-gram, it has more protein than red meat, chicken and eggs. How could we not use it, right?

What is spirulina?

It looks pretty simple – spirulina is a blue-green algae (technically a cyanobacteria) that grows in water. It’s a single-cell protein, but amazingly, is packed with other nutrients like iron, and amino acids like leucine. Leucine is a very popular amino acid in its own right, used by athletes in many sports for healthy, natural muscle recovery.

Our Spirulina Stretch ball is also made from 40% apricots, and with good reason. As well as being high in vitamins A and C, dried apricots are a great source of fibre and catechins, which help to reduce inflammation. That’s good news if you’re running, lifting weights, or putting stress on your joints.

Another ingredient we love in Spirulina Stretch is almonds. As well as being a great protein source, almonds are high in vitamin E (vitamin E is actually a group of 8 different nutrients), a powerful anti-oxidant and healthy heart supporter.

Almonds also contain good amounts of copper. Copper enables all sorts of reactions to take place in the body, and helps to keep blood vessels flexible and healthy.

The other ingredients in Spirulina Stretch are medjool dates and coconut. That’s it. Nothing else. No added sugar or preservatives at all.